Abstract
Musculoskeletal injuries and impairments result in over 100 million office visits in the United States per year. Tendons and muscle-related issues account for a significant percentage of these visits. As our population ages and remains active, the number of orthopedic-related problems will rise dramatically.1 Younger and older patients expect faster recovery from their injuries with less invasive procedures. Within this landscape, PRP has become a potential standalone or adjunctive treatment. The concept of using the growth factors within PRP to help heal wounds dates back to the early 1980s.2 Its use in orthopedic surgery, however, began during this decade and initially focused on the augmentation of bone grafting. The efficacy of PRP to accelerate bone healing continues to be debated in the literature.3–8 Employing PRP to augment tendon healing, however, has been advocated only recently.

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